UK Constitutional Law Association

affiliated to the International Association of Constitutional Law

Weekly round-up of events

This week’s event announcements include:

  1. ‘Exit from the European Union: Article 50, Parliament and the Prerogative in the UK Court’, University of Liverpool, 28 November 2016
  2. ‘Criticism and Accountability in Judging’, Policy Exchange, 28 November 2016
  3. ‘Parliament and the Prerogative: From the Case of Proclamations to Miller’, Policy Exchange, 30 November 2016

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u-of-liverpool-logo

Exit from the European Union: Article 50, Parliament and the Prerogative in the UK Court

Mon 28 November 2016, 14:00 – 16:30

University of Liverpool

This EU Law @ Liverpool seminar will bring together a range of public law academics to analyse the High Court judgments in England and Wales and Northern Ireland, which consider the domestic constitutional requirements for a lawful decision to trigger Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union, and therefore begin the process of negotiating UK withdrawal from the European Union. In addition to reacting to the High Court judgments on the Article 50 decision, our invited speakers will anticipate and reflect on lines of argument likely to feature significantly as this dispute is appealed to the UK Supreme Court in early December 2016. We will then open up the critical constitutional issues raised in these cases for a roundtable discussion among the seminar participants.

Speakers:

Professor Aileen McHarg (Strathclyde)

Dr Hélène Tyrrell (Newcastle)

Professor TT Arvind (Newcastle)

Dr Richard Kirkham (Sheffield)

Convenors:

Dr Mike Gordon (Michael.Gordon@liverpool.ac.uk)

Dr Adam Tucker (Adam.Tucker@liverpool.ac.uk)

For further information, and to sign up, click HERE.

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jpp-logo

Criticism and Accountability in Judging

Mon 28 November 2016

Policy Exchange

Time & Date

Monday 28 November

Registration: 13:00
Start:           13:15
End:            14:15

Venue

Policy Exchange
6th Floor
8-10 Great George Street
Westminster
SW1P 3AE

With

Rt Hon Lord Hope of Craighead
Former Deputy President of the Supreme Court and previously Lord President of the Court of Session

Rt Hon Lord Howard of Lympne
Former Leader of the Opposition and Home Secretary

Charles Moore
Columnist for The Daily Telegraph and authorised biographer of Lady Thatcher

Joshua Rozenberg
Legal Commentator and Journalist

Chaired by

Professor Graham Gee
Professor of Public Law at the University of Sheffield, and author of The Politics of Judicial Independence in the UK’s Changing Constitution (CUP, 2015)

Next month the Supreme Court will hear the Government’s appeal in the Miller judgment. The backdrop to that hearing is unusually heated: earlier this month, press and politicians reacted strongly to the High Court’s decision. Retired judges, lawyers and political opponents alleged that the Lord Chancellor, the Rt Hon Liz Truss MP, had not defended the judges sufficiently from press criticism. Public comments by Lady Hale of Richmond of the Supreme Court on the forthcoming Article 50 litigation have provoked criticism in turn. Running through these controversies are complex questions about when, how and why it is appropriate to criticise judges and their judgments.

Reflecting on the requirements of judicial independence and the accountability of public power, Policy Exchange’s Judicial Power Project brings together a panel from the worlds of law, politics and the press to debate these issues.

This event will be oversubscribed. To secure your place, please RSVP to events@policyexchange.org.uk

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Parliament and the Prerogative: From the Case of Proclamations to Miller

Wed 30 November 2016

Policy Exchange

Time & Date

Wednesday 30th November

Registration:      12.45
Start:                  13.15
Sandwich buffet:14.15 – 14.45

Venue

Policy Exchange
6th Floor
8-10 Great George Street
Westminster
SW1P 3AE

With

Professor Timothy Endicott

Professor of Legal Philosophy in the University of Oxford

Vote of Thanks by the Rt Hon Lord Strathclyde CH

Former Leader of the House of Lords

The Government’s argument in the Miller case is that triggering Article 50 lies within the power of the Crown to make and unmake international treaties – a power the leading litigant, Gina Miller, has termed ‘this ancient, secretive Royal Prerogative’. The legitimacy of the use of the prerogative is questioned by critics, who view its proposed use to trigger Article 50 as an unconstitutional scheme to bypass Parliament. In this lecture, Professor Endicott will argue that there are positive reasons of constitutional principle for an efficient, unified and democratic executive. We can only understand the extent of the executive power, and how it ought to be constrained, if we understand what it is for. Professor Endicott will argue that acting to initiate a withdrawal from the European Union is within the proper constitutional role of the executive. Using the royal prerogative in this way is entirely consistent with the sovereignty of Parliament.

This event will be oversubscribed. To secure your place, please RSVP to events@policyexchange.org.uk

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