UK Constitutional Law Association

affiliated to the International Association of Constitutional Law

Robert Craig: Why Royal Consent Is Required for the Proposed Article 50 Extension Bill

I wrote recently on this blog about the issue of Royal Assent. This post concerns the wholly separate issue of Royal Consent which is a requirement for those rare Bills … Continue reading

February 25, 2019 · 19 Comments

Stephen Laws: Why a Money Resolution with Queen’s Recommendation Is Required for a Bill for the Postponing or Cancelling of “Exit Day”

In a post on this blog yesterday, Andrew Denny argued that I was wrong to suggest that a money resolution, with Crown recommendation, would be needed under the Standing Orders … Continue reading

January 29, 2019 · Leave a comment

Andrew Denny: Would a Bill Seeking an Article 50 Extension Require a Money Resolution Proposed by the Government?

Introduction The on-going constitutional laboratory experiment that is Brexit has now turned to the question of whether a bill proposed by a backbench MP can be passed into law against … Continue reading

January 28, 2019 · 5 Comments

Robert Craig: Could the Government Advise the Queen to Refuse Royal Assent to a Backbench Bill?

Introduction As is well known, the Government’s Withdrawal Agreement was voted down in Parliament last week by 230 votes in a ‘meaningful vote’ mandated under s 13(1) of European Withdrawal … Continue reading

January 22, 2019 · 29 Comments

Jack Simson Caird: Brexit and the Meaningful Vote: Down the Procedural Raab-it Hole?

Brexit has a knack for producing constitutional mountains out of procedural molehills. Last Wednesday, the House of Commons Procedure Committee published a letter from the Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab along … Continue reading

October 22, 2018 · 3 Comments

Barbara Guastaferro: Disowning Edmund Burke? The Constitutional Implications of EVEL on Political Representation

“Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests; which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates” but rather “a … Continue reading

May 2, 2016 · 2 Comments

Thomas Fairclough: Constitutional Change, Standing Orders, and EVEL: A Step in the Wrong Direction?

In their 2015 General Election manifesto the Conservative Party promised to end the “manifest unfairness” whereby Scotland could decide its own laws within areas of devolved competence only to have … Continue reading

February 22, 2016 · 6 Comments