UK Constitutional Law Association

affiliated to the International Association of Constitutional Law

News: The House of Commons Political and Constitutional Reform Committee Reports on Royal Consent

Parliament from river

The House of Commons Political and Constitutional Reform Committee reported on the practice of Royal Consent. Royal Consent was discussed on this blog in a post by Thomas Carter Adams. The doctrine requires the consent of the Queen, or, in some situations, the Prince of Wales, before a bill which affects their personal interests is discussed in Parliament.

Unsurprisingly, the Committee recommends that this requirement be abandoned.  The Committee – like the correspondents to the earlier blog post – had some difficulty identifying precisely what type of constitutional rule this was: whether it was an aspect of the prerogative, a rule of parliamentary procedure, or a convention.  It concludes that it is a rule of parliamentary procedure, and so falls within the province of each House of Parliament to modify or remove.  The Committee concluded that the provision could be abolished by the Houses making an address to the Crown followed by a Resolution of each House.

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This entry was posted on March 30, 2014 by in Constitutional reform, UK Parliament and tagged .
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