UK Constitutional Law Association

affiliated to the International Association of Constitutional Law

Mike Gordon: Privacy International, Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Synthetic Constitution

The case of R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal  is the latest in a series of high profile judicial engagements with the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty.  The case concerned … Continue reading

June 26, 2019 · 2 Comments

Anurag Deb: Privacy International: A Matter of Constitutional Logic and Judicial Trust?

Introduction The High Court and Court of Appeal decisions in Privacy International v IPT have ignited the debate on the ‘validity’ or otherwise of ouster clauses in the UK constitution … Continue reading

January 8, 2019 · 1 Comment

Adam Tucker: Parliamentary Intention, Anisminic, and the Privacy International Case (Part Two)

In Part 1, I cast Anisminic as an example of a common law doctrine of interpretation which can require courts to depart from the intention of Parliament when interpreting ouster … Continue reading

December 19, 2018 · 3 Comments

Adam Tucker: Parliamentary Intention, Anisminic, and the Privacy International Case (Part One)

Introduction Earlier this month, the Supreme Court heard argument in R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal. This litigation has already attracted substantial scholarly attention in the published literature (notably … Continue reading

December 18, 2018 · 2 Comments

Hayley J. Hooper: Balancing Access to Justice and the Public Interest: Privacy International and Ouster Clauses in the Broader Constitutional Context

In November 2017, the Court of Appeal in R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal unanimously held that a so-called “ouster clause” in respect of the of the Investigatory Powers … Continue reading

February 12, 2018 · 1 Comment

Thomas Fairclough: Privacy International: Constitutional Substance over Semantics in Reading Ouster Clauses

I have previously written on this blog and elsewhere about statutory interpretation and the rule of law. In the previous blog post I stated that the idea “that the courts … Continue reading

December 4, 2017 · 4 Comments

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